Why You MUST Quit Your Day Job In 2013

Are you a writer, an actor, a musician, a poet, a painter, an entrepreneur or an explorer?

If you are creative, there is a good chance you find your place on the margins of society, on the outskirts of the village, where you are close enough to feel connected and yet far enough on the edge to see the wildness of God’s terrain uninterrupted by the systems and structures of humanity.

Do you ever feel contained, claustrophobic or drained of energy when you get to close to the center of the village?

Does your world feel upside down?

Maybe you are stuck in a permanent 9-5 job, working in a structure where you are just another cog in another persons machine. It may bring life to your wallet but is it death to your soul?

You can’t thrive in the center because you my friend are an artist and you were designed to live on the edge.

 

Upside down world

Be Inspired Daily By Seven Sentences

 

Copyright 2011: Seven Sentences – Upside Down World

24 Responses to “Why You MUST Quit Your Day Job In 2013”

  1. Johannes Hutagalung July 20, 2011 at 4:07 pm #

    Thanks Geoff… This post really give me a motivation.

  2. Kim Gottschild July 20, 2011 at 4:08 pm #

    That is so true.  I engage enough to stay connected and find inspiration for my work, but I need to be on the edge or I go crazy.

  3. Lynne Holder July 20, 2011 at 4:36 pm #

    “It may bring life to your wallet but is it death to your soul?”, describes my past career life, perfectly.

    You form an excellent word picture of where creatives live–on the fringe. Great snapshot of the creative heart. Well done, Geoff, as always.

  4. Lizzie July 20, 2011 at 4:43 pm #

    Wow.  A few weeks ago I decided that I will quit my job in late September because I’ve been miserable working and living the same routine day in and day out.  I have no plans, so I’m looking to God to provide.  I need to revive my soul while traveling, creating, and living.  Fantastic post. 

    • Lynne Holder July 21, 2011 at 12:44 am #

      Yay for you, Lizzie! Fellow quitter here–in mid-October. Did you sleep for a week after leaving the office? :)

      Where are you planning to travel?

      • Lizzie July 21, 2011 at 12:41 pm #

        Thanks, Lynne!  I haven’t yet, but I’m definitely planning on catching up on sleep!  In October, I’m going to Ireland for a few weeks, and then I guess I’ll decide where to go from there.  I’m not much on planning ahead, so that’s all I have so far.  And somewhere along the way I’ll need to make some money :)

        • Lynne Holder July 21, 2011 at 4:57 pm #

          Ireland! Sounds wonderful–definitely on my wish list of places to travel. One trip at a time, right? I know you’ll have a blast–enjoy.

    • apurva prabhawalkar July 23, 2011 at 1:28 pm #

      well! what can  I say. I was at an height of my creativity and wanted to do more.  you know officially, get into writing. I left my good, old job Last August. Slowly moving ahead towards a black hole. slowly, loosing my creativity to the daily routines.  I was good living out, away from the centre. But  I am hopeful,  I will get back on my creative foot.

  5. Peter Paluska July 20, 2011 at 6:46 pm #

    Good submission, Geoff. The key is to keep yourself centered while living on the edge!

    Thank you.

  6. Shannon Duston July 21, 2011 at 12:22 am #

    Love this post. I especially love this last line: “You can’t thrive in the center because you my friend are an artist and you were designed to live on the edge.”

    I can very much connect with this post in so many ways. I work a crazy job that many might consider “on the edge” on a daily basis. It’s a TV show that must feed live to air a couple times a day every day. People are always very stressed out and “on the edge” on a mostly daily basis, especially now more than ever given the economic environment where no one gets raises, some get pay cuts, some get extended layoffs, and others are let go all together. Originally a  hard job for me a few years back has only become even harder the last few years. I work in the center of probably the most intense and most stressed out people. Their anger, though often not directed at me personally or specifically, typically gets thrown at me because I’m the guy standing there in the middle of everything they need to do.None the less, point here being I’m not working a creative position at my current job. I stare at a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree on the wall in my office every day, wondering if I’ll ever actually find my own creative outlet. More importantly, I wonder if I’ll ever find the time I need for that thing, and the time that thing deserves from me. I became technical in an effort to make myself more valuable to the artist community and instead I ended up following a career that, while rewarding and allowing me some success financially and personally, has also handcuffed me to a railing just outside of the creative world I once planned to be a part of.Now, I’m a father of 2 with a wonderful wife at home. My career allows her to be with the kids without the worries of a daily job of her own. That’s the reality I’m choosing for now. I don’t have terrible hours most of the time so I too get to spend some time with my kids most weeks. I’ve had to accept that as my reality for now. I do hope little by little, and with more passing time, I’ll find my opportunities to be creative will grow and increase. And hopefully, in time, I’ll be able to make a transition to something much more creative for the long term on down the line. I have a very supportive wife so I know without question when the time comes that a transition like that opens itself up, my family will support me.

    Sorry for the run on…and too much info I’m sure for some to have time or interest to read. Feels nice to put it all out there though sometimes, even if just for my own writing enjoyment. : ) Hope it’s ok I choose to do it here!

    • Geoff Talbot July 21, 2011 at 2:19 pm #

      Hi Shannon,

      This is a great response. Thanks for sharing truthfully. This is the juggle of life huh. The tough part of being a grown up. Try and find small creative challenges each day that sustain you and grow your creativity. What could you do in 10 minute blocks? What could you write in ten minutes? What could you read in ten minutes. Just to water that creative part of your soul.

  7. Belinda (writerunblocked) July 21, 2011 at 12:46 am #

    I may be the minority here, but I actually get inspiration from my job. To be honest, my job has helped me keep up the creative process more then it has ever been. My colleagues are creative people too, so their encouragement helps to keep me focused.  The filling of my wallet is just a bonus.  

    Before I had this job, I was in a creative slump of about 4 years.  I was beginning to think that nothing was going to dig me out, but I met people at work who challenged me and sent the beginnings of that creative spark.  I have said in many of my posts that music is what brought me back to the Land of the Creative.  My job was just the diving board that sent me plunging back into my pool of ideas.  

    I can understand why folks would feel that their job has held them back, but I can honestly say that my job helped me.  

    • Geoff Talbot July 21, 2011 at 2:15 pm #

      Wow that is great Belinda, I love this. The right job can increase your creativity and provide you with inspiration. Thanks for sharing the alternative view.

  8. Sid Kali July 21, 2011 at 10:12 am #

    Fantastic post. It makes you think where you’re at in life. I agree with Peter’s comment on keeping centered. When you’re doing freelance writing gigs its great to balance it with your creative life. I do feel a lot less positive energy the closer to the center I am. I prefer living on the outskirts of the village.

    • Geoff Talbot July 21, 2011 at 2:19 pm #

      Thanks Sid, I really appreciate your post friend… G

  9. Anonymous July 22, 2011 at 12:43 am #

    I love my job! The best part of it is helping developing leaders find their courage, reveal their heart, clarify their best selves. So inspiring to be among people striving for personal excellence. I’m lucky that I have found a way to creatively share life stories and lessons through my job. I can be a little more “on the edge” though in my personal writing. Perhaps that will lead to another form of inspirational creative experience down the road. For now, There’s a pretty good balance,

    • Geoff Talbot July 23, 2011 at 3:12 pm #

       Excellent El; a most excellent and brilliant Seven Sentence comment (I counted). Thanks for an alternative view!

  10. Gary Loper July 22, 2011 at 10:11 pm #

    There comes a time for us creatives, that we realize that we are the proverbial square peg trying to fit into a round hole. Shaving off the edges to try and fit, feels as if our soul has been comprised. As artists, visionaries and wayseers we must find our own way – not to dismiss the routines that others find comfort in, because all levels are needed in society – and to work together with others like us to bring about the change and freedom for all. 

    • Geoff Talbot July 23, 2011 at 3:11 pm #

      Not to dismiss the routines that others find comfort in… Interesting thought Gary… but shouldn’t we challenge them, question them if we think they are not life-giving?

      I do know what you are saying but part of the tension in our continual and universal fight for freedom is that those on the fringes fight to extend the boundaries for those in the center. Don’t you think?

      Thanks so much for commenting Gary, as always.

      Geoff

      • Gary Loper July 28, 2011 at 12:02 am #

        Until they are seeking the information to create change, challenging them will not accomplish anything. Just as you tell a child not to touch the hot stove, they will still go to touch it, or attempting to tell your teenagers what they should do with their life.  They don’t listen do they?  I know I didn’t listen then, but the words were seeds and when I needed those lessons it came back.  Go forward to plant seeds to help create change and freedom, but realize that those seeds may not take root until much later, unless they are match with a hunger by the receiver to create that shift. 

      • Gary Loper July 28, 2011 at 12:02 am #

        Until they are seeking the information to create change, challenging them will not accomplish anything. Just as you tell a child not to touch the hot stove, they will still go to touch it, or attempting to tell your teenagers what they should do with their life.  They don’t listen do they?  I know I didn’t listen then, but the words were seeds and when I needed those lessons it came back.  Go forward to plant seeds to help create change and freedom, but realize that those seeds may not take root until much later, unless they are match with a hunger by the receiver to create that shift. 

  11. apurva prabhawalkar July 23, 2011 at 1:39 pm #

    “You can’t thrive in the center because you my friend are an artist and you were designed to live on the edge.” i like the line Geoff.

    I found my creative self while I was working on the edge too. It will be an year on August 8th, since I left my good old job, moved to city to do college.

    Well, college is a far away thought now, I am struggling to keep my struggling self alive. Living on edge, provides you a contact with the real world & nature.  Infact, it tests you real good. That could be a source of creativity. The routines of life, they don’t test- but exhaust. I will take this ‘comment’ as learing for myselft. Thanks for sharing the good word. cheers

    • Geoff Talbot July 23, 2011 at 3:08 pm #

      Wow thanks Apurva… I think it is possible to find adventure in the mundane. If we take risks in the relationships of those around us. Really settling in, taking time, listening and asking questions. Maybe the man you buy your vegetables from has a really interesting story to tell… you/we just have not asked him about it yet?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks:

  1. Living Life On The Edge | Seven Sentences - July 21, 2011

    [...] with fear issues will always try to pull you in to the safety of the center. It’s like the world is upside down the further up the ladder you climb the less life and adventure you [...]

Leave a Reply:

Gravatar Image

CommentLuv badge